terry walker

In 2001, at the young age of 19 I found myself in Atlanta at the end of a very dangerous lifeline. My prior years were full of forgotten achievements and poor decisions. I was arrogant (due to my ability to learn faster than 99 percent of my peers), poor (due to my mother’s decision to live off of the welfare system), and angry (due to my constant battles with authority figures). I was forced to flee my hometown of Brooklyn New York due to a run in with the law. The next two years would find me in and out of the State of Georgia’s Justice System.
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In 2001, at the young age of 19 I found myself in Atlanta at the end of a very dangerous lifeline. My prior years were full of forgotten achievements and poor decisions. I was arrogant (due to my ability to learn faster than 99 percent of my peers), poor (due to my mother’s decision to live off of the welfare system), and angry (due to my constant battles with authority figures). I was forced to flee my hometown of Brooklyn New York due to a run in with the law. The next two years would find me in and out of the State of Georgia’s Justice System. At the time I was illegally occupying a boarding house and loitering at Clark Atlanta University. After 3 years of using the University’s facilities as sleeping quarters and participating in other illegal activities at the school, the schools police force finally restricted me from setting foot on their campus. At the age of 21 I decided to lease a room on the perimeter of the campus. I started dating the landlord’s daughter and eventually (along with another tenant and good friend of mines) took control of the entire house. My friend (the other tenant) and I took poor care of the property and allowed it to turn into the neighborhood hangout. After witnessing the negative world that I had embraced and letting enough time pass to feel comfortable with engaging in deep conversation with me, my new friend (the other tenant) asked me a simple question that changed my entire thought process. He asked me “What’s wrong with you New York people”? He continued by adding “You call each other “friends” and then steal from each other. You love to fight with your girlfriends and make up almost every day but call it “love” etc. Why can’t you just do good and hang with good people? Why can’t you agree to disagree?” I couldn’t answer either of his questions. All I could do is agree and walk away. Later on that week I had awaken from a nap while a few of my friends were engaging in conversation. All I overheard were recollections of their daily criminal feats, sexual escapades, and negative perceptions of those that they’ve come across. That was they moment that I decided to live. A light went off in my head accompanied by a voice that said “you are what and who you surround yourself with”. That evening I had a dream and it gave me specific guidelines to assist me with my new way of life. I call them my own little set of commandments. I was told to 1. Help as many people as possible, 2. Try not to hurt anyone, 3. Try not to hurt yourself, and 4. Be better than you were yesterday. Soon after, I became a student at Clark Atlanta University. I received my bachelor’s degree in Business Administration with a concentration in Marketing from American Intercontinental University. In 2009, I went on to get my master’s degree in the same fields of study. This is when I knew I escaped the “Dangers of my Mind”. Currently I am 34 pursuing my doctoral degree in International Marketing with a lovely wife and 18 month old daughter. I am also the proud co-owner of Tastemakers Management Group, The Coliseum Consulting Group, and www.AtlantaMusicMag.com. I’ve been a Big Brother (in the Big Brother Big Sister Program) for 7 years and I even generate generous revenue off of my own music endeavors. I made a decision to change and God guided my steps. My first one was to separate myself from those that didn’t have a positive mission of their own. All I ask anyone wanting to make a life direction change is… What will your first step be?